Archive for Clavinet

Hohner Clavinet D6: “Rebirth” Restoration

An Overview of The Chicago Electric Piano Company’s Clavinet Restoration Service

Hohner Clavinet D6 Logo and Latch

Clavinet CEPCo Brick Logo & Case

Wow! Cosmetically this is THE most mint Clavinet that has ever passed through the workshop! This Hohner Clavinet D6 must have spent most of its life packed up in a safe place. And now after receiving our “Rebirth” services this thing is playing and sounding better than ever! –Scroll down to have a glimpse of the pictures below!

Hohner Clavinet D6 with Legs Full View

Hohner Clavinet Back Full View

This Clavinet was restored with what would fall under our “Rebirth” Clavinet Services with all new hammer tips, strings, electronic servicing, and a complete detailed setup. Through the restoration process each key was removed individually for cleaning and a thorough setup for the proper key travel and an articulate percussive attack. We used our favorite hammer tips and strings from Ken Rich Sound Services, which have proven to be hands-down the top quality of all the Clavinet parts available. This D6 now delivers all the percussive attack and tone you want from a Clavinet.

Clavinet Strings and Yarn

Clavinet Strings and Yarn by The Chicago Electric Piano Company

Clavinet Damper Arm

Clavinet Hammer Tips by Ken Rich Sound Services

Clavinet Strings and Pickups

The D6’s amplifier is notoriously noisy and we service all our amps to reduce this noise without interfering with the classic tone that we all know and love about the D6. Then an enclosure of copper shielding is formed around the amplifier that helps reduce any interference noise picked up by the amplifier. From our experience many of the hiss reduction techniques suggested on youtube videos, forums, and sold as “Hiss Reduction Kits” suggest implementing techniques that negatively affect the tone of the amplifier. That is because these techniques use low pass filtering techniques that overly impacts the tone of the amp. These filtering techniques are not necessary with the right knowledge of how the D6 amplifier is supposed to be setup.

Clavinet D6 Copper Amplifier Shielding

Clavinet D6 Amplifier Shielding and Low Noise Hiss Reduction

These days there aren’t too many Clavinets that still have their original legs and latches. And the wood and tolex were also in immaculate shape. It was a pleasure to come across this instrument and it sold on our waiting list before we even had a chance to list it for sale.

If are looking for a fully restored Clavinet please contact max@chicagoelectricpiano.com and we will help you track down a Clavinet to meet your budget. All instruments are appraised based on the model, cosmetic condition, and their overall condition.

Clavinet Case and Legs

Clavinet D6 Back Logo and Wood Top

Clavinet D6 Top View

Clavinet D6 Control Panel

Clavinet d6 Faceplate Logo

Hohner Clavinet Control Panel

Clavinet D6 Faceplate Closeup

Clavinet Damper Arm Adjustment

Clavinet Damper Arm

Hohner Clavinet D6 Pickup and Damper

Clavinet d6 Keys Closeup

 

Hohner Clavinet D6 at Chicago Electric Piano

Hohner Clavinet D6 Back View Lid Open

Hohner Clavinet Logo Closeup

If are looking for a fully restored Clavinet please contact max@chicagoelectricpiano.com and we will help you track down a Clavinet to meet your budgetAll instruments are appraised based on the model, cosmetic condition, and their overall condition.

 

Choosing the Best Amplifier for a Rhodes or Wurlitzer

There are many opinions floating around on the best way to amplify an electric piano. Most of which can inevitably be summed up by our favorite sound engineering cliche — “It all depends on the tone your are looking for!” While this is invariably true, here are some more concrete guidelines for choosing the right amp for your Fender Rhodes or Wurlitzer electric piano.

Solid State v. Tube –

This is an ongoing argument that we could write paragraphs about. Perhaps here is where your personal sonic preferences will come most into play. To be concise, The Chicago Electric Piano Company fully endorses tube amplification  The saturation of vacuum tubes really enhances the harmonic overtones created by the reeds/tines in these instruments. The warmth and depth of tube amplification brings out the best tones from your electric piano. Read more

Stretch Tuning vs. Equal Temperament Tuning

Stretch Tuning vs. Equal Temperament Tuning: The Proper Way to Tune Your Rhodes, Wurlitzer or Clavinet.

 

What is the difference between Stretch Tuning and Equal Temperament Tuning? And why can’t you tune a piano with a guitar tuner?

 

If you took a high school or university physics class that had a unit on the physics of sound, you may recall learning that notes an octave apart have a frequency ratio of 2:1. These are the place holders for the two ends of a scale. Taking this basic knowledge, it may seem reasonable to take the twelve notes of the scale and divide the octave into even portions. If this were the case, over the course of several octaves as on a piano’s keyboard manual, the harmonies would begin to sound dissonent. But why? In the most simplified terms, this is because as intervals move further apart, the human ear finds the beats generated by the two or more frequencies unpleasant. Luckily, there are alternate methods of tuning that produce more appealing harmonies.

When two intervals are played together, the combination of the two or more frequencies produce beats. The rate of the beats is a function of the differences in frequency of the two pitches, which is one of the components of how the human ear interprets harmonies. In order to produce the most appealing harmonies in a piano or ensemble, a number of tuning philosophies exist that create more pleasant beats, and can even account for inharmonicity within the instrument (more on inharmonicity in a later post). The philosophies typically use more pure major thirds, minor thirds, fourths, fifths—you name itRead more